disk usage analyzers

Image result for pies

sometimes you need more than df or du, you need a disk usage analyser tool to show other metrics in a visual way. these are handy tools, and there are a few great examples out there, commercial and open source. the following are a few unix/linux notable examples:

qdirstat – powerful, perhaps too much for an analyzer… you could use this as an interface to navigate the file structure and actually review files(and delete them), review statistics and locate files by type. histograms, pie charts, medians, percentiles, this is an analysts dream tool, but i really hate tree view.https://i1.wp.com/raw.githubusercontent.com/shundhammer/qdirstat/master/screenshots/QDirStat-main-win.png?resize=584%2C357&ssl=1

disk usage reports – one of may favorite, but slow and long in the tooth. it’s easy to navigate and review top 100, by age, by size and by type, but lacks the ability to define file types the way qdirstat performs. it’s also not the kitchen sink, so it only shows what is taking space, via web interface.

https://i0.wp.com/diskusagereports.com/images/screenshot3.jpg?w=584

agedu – a heat map based on age and size. not bad at all for quick analysis. potential to perform remote reports to be dumped to another server make it handy.

flamegraph – flame maps not my thing, but you can use this for more than disk analysis. the fact that it generates an svg means it’s possible to create web enabled reports

ncdu – Ncurses disk usage is nice, clean, simple and easy to use, but lacks the ability to sort by date… BTW, why do disk usage analyzers need the ability to manipulate files, like delete?

Ncdu asking for confirmation to delete a file.

disk usage analyzer – builtin to the gnome environment, it provides the ability to review size, age, and directory path with an interactive sunburst display. i find the sunburst style chart to be intuitive even though it’s not factually accurate like the flame graph style, its close enough for government work. unfortunately there’s no web interface, only x11.

7 Great Apps to View Disk Usage in Linux linux disk analyzers baobab

JDiskReport – it’s not a commercial product, but it does have a restrictive license preventing modifications and derivations. it’s pretty intuitive and on par with disk usage report, but lacks a web interface.

https://i0.wp.com/www.jgoodies.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/o1960.jpg?w=584

not specific to disk analysis, but worthy of an honerable mention:

phpsysinfo – this is more of a system status dashboard, with the ability to report on disk usage, but only in a df capacity

https://i0.wp.com/sourceforge.net/p/phpsysinfo/screenshot/294399.jpg?w=584&ssl=1

dammit i forgot to sudo…

before editing a file in vi.

no sweat, there’s a way to fix that without redirecting to another file.

:w !sudo tee %

thats’s a nice way to elevate your privileges, so long as you have sudo access.

Interactive Vim tutorial

Every new Linux user should learn vi… simple/basic editing in vi:
open an existing file
create a new file
save a file
save a file as a different name
undo a change
cancel saving a file.

this isn’t a vi versus Emacs position, it’s common sense.
vi is installed as a default editor in almost every UNIX-variant.

Dr Taylor has one of the best documents to discuss the devils’ text editor:
Unix is a Four Letter Word… and Vi is a Two Letter Abbreviation

Source: Interactive Vim tutorial

Linux File System Hierarchy

it’s alway nice to see an infographic for file systems, like on this site.

YMMV based on distro, FHS foundation specifications found here.